Alternative types of communication 

Under construction!

The Listen Include Respect guidelines are still being completed - stay tuned for illustrations which will be added shortly to help explain these guidelines!
 

1

Remember, everyone can communicate.

 

Everyone communicates differently and has different communication needs. 

 

It is up to you just to adapt to their  individual communication style.

Communicating using easy-to-understand language makes it easier for people with intellectual disabilities to communicate. But some people will need alternative types of communication to help them take part.

2

​Alternative types of communication for people who don’t speak with their mouths to communicate are called Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC).

3

Ask the person using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) what works for them.

Some types of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) are high tech. For example, communication apps on phones or tablets.

 

Other types of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) are low tech. For example, picture cards.

3

Always talk to the person you are communicating with, not their support person.

4

Give people time to use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC).

5

Check with the person if you don’t understand something. 

6

Consider getting training on Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC).

Useful resources

55b.jpg

Training video about AAC 

71.jpg

Guide to including AAC users